PBS Station Services chief to exit next week

By Dru Sefton

Joyce Herring, s.v.p. of station services for PBS, is leaving the network Oct. 31, President Paula Kerger announced today in an email to station executives.

Kerger attributed Herring’s departure “to a series of unexpected circumstances requiring her immediate attention.”

Herring

Herring

Herring, who joined PBS in 2007, is the third senior executive to depart in the past month. John McCoskey, the network’s top engineer, recently left to join the Motion Picture Association of America; Jason Seiken, head of digital media, took a position with the Telegraph Media Group in London.

As head of station services, Herring’s main responsibility has been ensuring that the interests of member stations are represented in decisions regarding PBS’s management and strategic direction. She has also overseen the development and conference services departments, acted as a liaison to the PBS Board’s Station Services Committee and served on the board of the PBS Foundation. “Particularly noteworthy,” Kerger said, “are Joyce’s efforts updating member station policies, helping stations increase operational effectiveness and overseeing the recent national meeting innovations.”

Before joining PBS’s management team, Herring was g.m. of KACV-TV/FM in Amarillo, Texas, starting in 1988.

“I hold the highest respect possible for the institution of public media and the deep commitment of the individuals making the content and services,” Herring said in a statement included in Kerger’s email. “It’s obvious that public television improves the quality of life for Americans and it’s been an honor to be at PBS helping achieve such a meaningful purpose. I look forward to continuing that work in the near future.”

A search for Herring’s replacement is to begin immediately, according to the email.  Kerger tapped Thomas Crockett, v.p. member affairs, to lead will lead the station services team on an interim basis.

“We appreciate Joyce’s tireless dedication, dedicated leadership and many contributions to public media and, most of all, her wry sense of humor,” Kerger said. “I know you will join me in wishing her the greatest success in her future endeavors.”

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT