Takeaway shifts to middays in bid for broader carriage

Posted: July 9, 2012

WNYC will move production of The Takeaway to later in the day and trim its length to one hour starting in September in an effort to boost carriage of the off-the-cuff news show that set out to challenge Morning Edition.

The New York station launched The Takeaway with co-producer Public Radio International in 2008 as an alternative to NPR’s morning blockbuster — the newscomer with a more spontaneous approach and increased audience interaction. But after four years, the show airs on the primary broadcast signals of 55 stations, up by just 15 since September 2009. Ten additional stations air it on digital multicast channels.
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Where does Car Talk belong? Let listeners decide

Posted: June 26, 2012

NPR’s v.p. of programming responds Ira Glass’s suggestion that stations not devote prime weekend airtime to Car Talk reruns after the Magliozzi brothers retire this fall. Like Ira, I’m really excited about all the innovation in public radio today. Each … Continue reading

Want new radio hits on Saturday? Step 1: Drop Car Talk when the guys retire

Posted: June 25, 2012

I enjoy Car Talk. I like those guys. And as a public radio lifer, I’m grateful for what Tom and Ray Magliozzi did to bring a vast audience to public radio, year after year.. … But — with all respect to Doug Berman and my colleagues at Car Talk Plaza — I think when they stop making new episodes in October, they should be pulled from Saturday mornings. Continue reading

‘If we can imagine it, why don’t we do it?’

Posted: June 20, 2012

It was raining in Baltimore Sept. 23 when independent producer Jay Allison delivered his “benediction,” the traditional closing speech of the Public Radio Program Directors annual conference. The bleary, conferenced-out audience listened closely. Allison, who learned the nonfiction radio craft … Continue reading

Film explores influence of WBAI freeform pioneer

Posted: June 11, 2012

A documentary on this year’s film festival circuit examines the legacy of a New York countercultural legend whose techniques for mixing music and conversation in live radio shows had a profound influence on noncommercial broadcasting and the musical sensibilities of his generation. Continue reading

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