Monday roundup: Joe Bev plays Monty, actress speaks out for public media

By Current Staff

Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, left, and his portrayer, Joe Bevilacqua.

Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, left, and his portrayer, Joe Bevilacqua.

• Joe Bevilacqua of pubradio’s The Joe Bev Hour portrays British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery in an upcoming extended version of a History Channel miniseries, The World Wars. “Bevilacqua landed the role due to his striking resemblance to the World War II hero and because he can do a spot-on British dialect,” a press release notes. The six-hour program premiered over Memorial Day weekend and will air on the H2 channel in more than 120 countries with new footage on June 22; he can be seen in Episode 3, “Never Surrender.”

• South Dakota Public Broadcasting is one of the stations affected by Target’s recent credit-card breach, reports the Argus Leader in in Sioux Falls.  The declined or out-of-date cards are costing SDPB between $1,200 and $1,500 a month. The paper cited Current‘s June 9 national story on the issue.

• Actress Amy Brenneman (Judging Amy, Private Practice) says she and her family are “enthusiastic fans of public media” in a new video from Protect My Public Media. PBS SoCal created and produced the spot for the online advocacy campaign, which is co-managed by the Association of Public Television Stations and NPR.

• Miles O’Brien, science correspondent for PBS NewsHour, recalls the turmoil after his left arm was amputated, in a dramatic first-person piece in the latest New York magazine. One of the few bright spots was the reaction of staff at the pubTV newsmag: “At the PBS NewsHour, where I am treated like family, they were just as accepting and supportive as my own children. When I asked if I should shoot and edit around my disability, my boss told me, ‘No one cares. Just be your smart, engaging self.’”

• It’s a pillow protest! One opponent of the proposed channel-sharing agreement between Georgia Public Broadcasting and the student-run WRAS is speaking out through emboldened embroidery; these pics ran on the Twitter stream of an attorney for the Student Press Law Center. The takeover was just delayed until June 29, to address student concerns.

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